±Save On Expat Insurance

±Your Account


Create Account
and get our Guide to Moving Abroad - FREE! 


Username
Password


Forgotten password/username?

±Get Email Updates

Notify me when new content is added

±Social Media - Follow Us!

Driving and Public Transportation

Cyprus - Driving and Public Transportation



Driving is on the left in Cyprus. The maximum speed limit on motorways is 100 kph (60 mph) and on other roads 50 kph (30 mph), unless a different speed limit is indicated.

The use of seat-belts for front seat passengers is compulsory. Children under the age of 5 are not allowed to sit in the front passenger seat, and those under 10 can only sit in the front if a child's seat belt is used.

The drink driving regulations are strictly enforced in Cyprus, with on the spot fines. The alcohol limit in breath is 39 mg per 100 ml, and in blood 90 mg per 100 ml.

Roads are fairly well maintained in and between the main towns, and there are four-lane motorways connecting Nicosia with Limassol and Larnaca. Rural roads are still largely unsurfaced but are generally in fair condition.

The standard of driving is fairly poor, and minor accidents are common. Local drivers often fail to indicate when pulling out in front of you, and are reportedly reluctant to stop at red traffic lights. There tends to be heavy traffic congestion in the centre of towns during the morning and evening rush hours.

Short-term visitors to Cyprus can drive on their own national licence or on an international licence. They must take out insurance with a company authorised to conduct motor insurance business in Cyprus.

To obtain a Cypriot driving licence, foreign nationals must either pass the Cypriot driving test or surrender their own domestic licence in exchange for a Cypriot licence. The Cypriot driving test consists of a short theory test of 5-6 questions, and a practical test of around half an hour.

There is a good network of buses and mini-buses operating within and between all Cyprus' main towns, as well as shared taxi services on the same routes, which are reasonably priced. Taxi fares for non-shared services can be expensive, and meters are not generally fitted, so it is important to agree a fare before setting off. There are no rail services in Cyprus.

Visitors are allowed to travel between the North and the South of the country.




blog comments powered by Disqus

Expat Focus Preferred Health Insurance Partners


Bupa International

At Bupa we have been helping individuals and families live longer, healthier, happier lives for over 60 years. We are trusted by expats in 190 different countries and have links with healthcare organisations throughout the world. So whether you\'re moving abroad for a change of career or a change of scene, with our international private health insurance you will always be in safe hands.

Cigna

Cigna has worked in international health insurance for more than 30 years. Today, Cigna has over 71 million customer relationships around the world. Looking after them is an international workforce of 31,000 people, plus a network of over 1 million hospitals, physicians, clinics and health and wellness specialists worldwide, meaning you have easy access to treatment.