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Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Morocco.
Subforums: Property for Sale/Rent

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Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2005 6:05 am

I have a few of questions about Morocco.

First, what are the gun laws like in Morocco? Here in the US, a person with a clean record can buy most types of guns, and concealed carry permits are possible in most of the country. Is it possible for a non-citizen in Morocco to keep a gun? Is it possible to carry a gun there, as it is in most of the US and parts of Europe? Just to be clear, I'm not asking this because I'm paranoid, or because I think I need a gun. It's that I'm thinking of moving to Morocco long-term and (to me) my right to own and carry a gun is something I won't compromise on in the country where I live. I fully recognize that a lot of people don't feel the same way as I do about it. To make an analogy, it would be very important for a gay person to live in a country that has good respect for gay rights, and yet those who are not gay can't understand at all why a gay person would be attracted to the same sex. Gun owners are sort of like gay people: there's something which is very important to us, which others probably think is strange, incomprehensible, wrong, etc. Anyway, that's my question.

Second, what are the possiblities of citizenship in Morocco? Another thing that I feel is that I don't want to "put down roots" somewhere where I'll never be a citizen. For example, some people live in UAE for decades but can never get citizenship. This interferes with their ability to own property, with their sense of stability, with getting fair treatment in the legal system, etc. So I would never move to the UAE because I know that citizenship is impossible there. What is the status of Morocco?

My third question, can someone give me a general sense of real estate prices for a nice condo in a good part of a good town there? I saw the other post that says mortgages are available with 50% down. That sounds good to me and I have a good feeling about Moroccan real estate.

Thank you for your answers

 

AfricaBound
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Re: Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Wed Oct 19, 2005 2:58 am

Hello AfricaBound,

What a question! I am Moroccan and I confess that I have never ever thought about gun ownership here in Morocco, simply because it is not an issue here. It is very simple: no one owns a gun except for the military, the police, very high level criminals and hunters. So I take it that it's prohibited and I am not sure what the situation with foreigners is, but with the ongoing war on terror, I would be surprised if gun ownership is allowed exceptionally for non Moroccans.

As to the question about citizenship, I am afraid Moroccan citizenship is extremely hard to get. I know only 2 persons who were able to get it, but both had lived in Morocco for over 15 years and had Moroccan born children. I have left Morocco some 6 years ago now, but if you are currently in touch with someone living there, then you could try to have him/her get you some info about that at the Ministry of Justice. It is posssible that the new King has relaxed those old rules.

Hope the above will help.

 

Shireen
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Re: Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Thu Oct 20, 2005 6:06 am

Shireen, merci pour les infos. I talked with my friend there and this is roughly what she said:

She has never touched a gun. She said they basically aren't in circulation in Morocco like they are in the US or even in France (it's not difficult to buy a revolver in France). She found the idea a bit shocking and said she was scared of them. No problem, I told her I would teach her how to shoot (I'm an expert shooter). Anyway... it sounds like hunting arms are possible, such as hunting rifles and hunting shotguns. That's true almost everywhere in the world, and I'm sure Morocco has rules that allow foreigners to bring in hunting arms too. So if I go there I'll end up with a nice double-barrel shotgun. Unfortunately it sounds like carrying a pistol is not remotely possible there.

In my conversation with her I pointed out "You have never voted and you have never shot a gun." I think that's sad. To me, freedom is voting, being armed, and having freedom of speech, privacy and freedom of religion.

I also asked about citizenship. She said that rules are more relaxed than they used to be. She said it used to be very strict.

I guess I need to talk to a lawyer "on the ground" to get specific answers to these questions.

 

AfricaBound
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Re: Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Thu Oct 20, 2005 9:23 pm

Hello Africabound,

If a lot of people do not vote in Morocco it is only due to the fact that many of them do not believe that it will make a difference. The government does urge citizens to vote but few people are receptive. I have lived in the States for a few years and I can tell you that you will find that the concept of "freedom" is very different in Morocco. The few steps towards democracy that were made by the new King were negated by the war against terror. Now, we are back to the old days when national security had top priority over civil liberties. If many rights that were taken for granted were lost in the US after 9/11, just imagine what could have happened in a developing country, with a traditional monarchy system.

Good luck.

 

Shireen
Frequent Poster
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To AfricaBound--Gun questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 2:51 pm

As a long-term foreign resident of Morocco, I can tell you that guns ARE permitted in Morocco, but NOT pistols or rifles of any type (including .22 rifles, which are also expressly forbidden).

Many Moroccans hunt for birds with shotguns, which as you know, are non-rifled barrels. Moroccans also hunt for wild boar and other small game, with NON-RIFLED guns. They take shot guns and put in a bullet, which is shot without rifling. I am not a hunter, but my husband mentioned 9 mm as a common size bullet used here in hunting.

It is my understanding that pistols and rifles (of any type) are permitted only for the military and/or police.

You can get very specific information on this by contacting the Moroccan Embassy in your own country, and asking them specifically what types of guns can be owned and imported. They will tell you exactly.

 

Topaz/Morocco
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 7:22 pm

Regarding Moroccan citizenship, I have also heard that it is hard to get. You have to learn Arabic, convert to Islam (I think), and take a Moroccan surname. That being said, it must be that you don't have to swear allegiance, because I know one American who did get Moroccan citizenship, yet kept his American passport (and American surname on that passport).

 

Topaz/Morocco
Regular Poster
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Re: Legal and practical questions about Morocco

Post Posted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 7:26 pm

Regarding prices of condos, prices vary a lot by city. What city/cities are you considering?

Also, be aware that once you buy, you cannot freely take money out of Morocco. There is a bureau of exchange, to which you can submit a request--so keep careful proof of any money you bring into Morocco, and and of purchases made.

Also, you can only buy in cities that are zoned residential--you could not build a home in the countryside, as that land is zoned agricultural, and not permitted for foreigners to buy.

 

Topaz/Morocco
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