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Norway Taxes

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Norway.

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Re: Norway Taxes

Post Posted: Sat Jun 05, 2010 8:14 pm

But you can't have a tax card if you're not registered on the Folkregister and you may also be required to insist on having a forskudsskattkort. If you work as a musician, artiste or sportsperson, you will be in the Artsiste Skatt system. It seems there is nothing "seekable" on the internet covering this. If you work in Norway more than 6 months then you move from being a temporary worker in the artiste skatt system into the main system which is where your problems begin since, if you have been travelling around Norway working, you will find lots of unanswered post when you return to wherever your mail has been going (if you have a stable address at all that is .... apparently you're not allowed to work in Norway without a stable address).

Unfortunately, even though the tax office has all the information of where you've been working at your disposal, they don't understand you cannot be at "home" in the UK dealing with your Norwegian Tax and at the places where they know you're working at the same time.

The Norwegian news has recently had a few stories about "double contracts" where workers are returning home and finding they are being asked to pay more in taxes to Norway than they received in wages whilst there working and, as I posted elsewhere, I know of an eastern European who came to Norway, worked for 3 months, got paid nothing, returned home to find he was being billed for the 15% tax due on the money he'd never been paid.

I was adversely affected in 2009 when, by September, I had been unpaid over 100,000NOK for contracts in a chain of Norwegian hotels and the same thing happened to me, I have been living off British credit cards and having borrow momney off them to pay artiste tax on the wages I never received from last year until February 2010, about a year late. The hotel paid the contractor, the contractor "lost" the money so the hotel paid me TWICE (you have to feel sorry for them too).

If you're self employed, the Norwegians are paying later and later or not at all. I sell on both the UK ebay and Norwegian QXL. Ebay in the UK is safer. If you have to hire a Norwegian lawyer to chase money for you ..... well, work it out ...

 

JonInNorway
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Norway Taxes

Post Posted: Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:10 am

To put flesh on the bones of the tax situation, quoting from my Tax assessment notice of 2007 mailed to the UK 15th October 2008

Net wealth 0
Tax Class 1
Pension points 1,7 (when UDI had told me I lived in the UK!?)
Net Income 276 900
Pensionable Income 176 900

Bearing in mind I had already had 35226,- NOK deducted at source as a kind of 15% up front deduction and the State was asking for an additional 67172,- NOK plus social security contributions of 18928,- NOK making a total of 86100,- plus 4132,- interest and rising giving a total bill of 90232,-

350400,- was the most I could have possibly made in 2007 GROSS. I had already had 35226 deducted at source. Add the 90323 to that and you get 125458,- as the total demand for tax and social security for 2007.

Maintainance for your children is not taken into account and neither were the travel expenses for 11677km MINIMUM travelled in 2007. On top of that, despite telling the tax office in a fax a few days after I received this my Norwegian postal address, they were still sending post to it in July 2009 ... so you can see how interest mounts up while post is reaching you.

Add to this level of deductions the fact that out of what's left I have to pay £15 every time I go through a tunnel 25 minutes away from my house (on the way to 70% of my work) and then £10 on a ferry 30 minutes after the tunnel and you can see why I'm advising you to do a very detailed spreadsheet of any job opportunities you're offered over here.

The greatest salary can very quickly disappear and leave you wondering if you can afford to turn the heating up!

Oh .... and if I have no work, I'm entitled to nothing at all from the Norwegian state except emergency health care.

 

JonInNorway
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Norway Taxes

Post Posted: Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:23 am

Norway has a lot going for it and you may be lucky but be careful. Switzerland is also complicated since each Canton levies it's own taxes and has hidden charges. The last job I got there wasn't a good deal. Before you go, it's impossible to work out what you'll receive NETT! Sweden's pretty dead right now, Denmark's not doing great. Most of the Brits I knew in Norway have headed for Holland. It's in the EU, easier communications with the UK but when I worked there I thought they wanted a lot of work for the money, like Switzerland and Sweden and allegedly Denmark.

I love going back to the UK and if there was work there for me I'd go back tomorrow. My Norwegian son loves the UK and likes English kids.

I'd advise Englishmen against having kids here. I know 3 other Englishmen in Norway with kids. All the marriages are broken up and they're all facing up to going back to the UK because they can't earn enough to deal with the deductions. Norway has a great welfare state. Someone's got to pay for it.

 

JonInNorway
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Norway Taxes

Post Posted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 9:05 am

This is the kind of text you will have to understand or deal with via the google translator

"Vedk krav frå skatteoppkrevjaren i Jølster - forskotsskatt.

Kravet som forfalt 18. mai var kr 4300,00 (forskotsskatt 2. termin 2010), dersom du betaler dette beløpet er du ajour fram til hausten;
forfall 3.termin 15.09.2010 (4300,00)
forfall 4.termin 15.11.2010 (4300,00), slik skatten er pr i dag.

Forskotsskatt for 2009 - her har du betalt kr 17 000,00, kravet er opprinneleg
kr 53 000,00, rest kr 36 000,00, evt forlite betalt forskotsskatt vil bli ståande ved lag ved avrekning/skatteoppgjer 2009."

 

JonInNorway
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Norway Taxes

Post Posted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 3:34 pm

What a horrible nightmare you describe. Hmm
very offputting. I had received Norwegian communication months and months after I last worked in Norway, and years ago to an address miles and miles away in another galaxy I no longer resided in. The letter was all in Norweg so I tried looking at it upside down plus sideways with the light behind it, and it made more sense; but as I am not a Norwegian, cannot read such, and am not prepared or rich enough to pay for NOR translation, it fitted in the bin perfectly.

Otherwise of course I should have loved to reply in suitable Norway with knobs on. Its very odd that the Norwegians are so parochial about their language that they feel its good to send out incomprehensible messages to foreigners. Perhaps they would learn the folly of it if we made sure to always write back to them in Farsi, Eskimo, or Blatwort, Only one that they cannot understand of course, so Blatwort has it 'rkngjeop atpaVin gsktee@' as it were.

I wonder now if the incomprehensibolke forskotsskatt vil bli ståande skatteoppgje message from somewhere in Norway was really a refund of taxes! Unlikely that, so I fear it was a massive extra demand! Hmm. Maybe shouldnt bother going to Nogginland again, dont want to find the heavy tax I shovelled to them last time wasnt enough.

I see from the funny potted idea of Norwegian tax its about 45%, and working out likely deductions I wouldnt actually make more than remaining ltd in the UK. Heck, plan B awaits my pen.

 

ukengineer
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
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