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Legal aspects of working for room and board

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in China.

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Legal aspects of working for room and board

Post Posted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:22 am

I am aware of over a hundred offers of room and board in China in return for "a little help." Seems like most involve teaching, but some are childcare or farm assistance. I am wondering about (1) would I get in trouble for accepting such an offer; and (2) would the person offering get in trouble?

(2) is more important, as my penalty would be merely getting kicked out of the country, but theirs likely much harsher.

I don't personally want to move to China as an expat, but I would like to spend longer than a typical tourist visit. Maybe a year, maybe less. I enjoy teaching, and have experience, but have not bothered to get certified. And I can do other things, but I don't want to take a job away from a local person. On the other hand, if the host can't afford to hire a local, and we can do it legally, it would be great.


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Wes Groleau
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WGroleau
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Re: Legal aspects of working for room and board

Post Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:59 pm

Well, since no takers here, I'll answer based on what little I've been able to find out:

The answer to (1) for USA is that if you tell the truth at the border, you won't be allowed in. And if you lie and get caught—trouble. China, I SUSPECT is the same. WWOOF advises you to be dishonest—to tell them you are going as a tourist ands hide the fact the you intend to work for room and board. WorkAway is more professional—they have somewhere in their terms and conditions that it's up to you to get the proper paperwork.

The answer to (2) is … I don't know. But now I have question #3: If I contact the person and ask them for an invitation letter, will that cause the Chinese authorities to investigate them and prosecute them for the visits they have done in the past?


_________________

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Wes Groleau
Happy Hobo
伟思礼

 

WGroleau
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Re: Legal aspects of working for room and board

Post Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:27 am

Some more details: travel.stackexchange.c...5482/12555


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Wes Groleau
Happy Hobo
伟思礼

 

WGroleau
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