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Cayman's crime problem

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in the Cayman Islands.

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Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:43 am

Statistically, we who live here are far more likely to be killed or injured in traffic accidents caused by young tearaways in souped-up cars, than by thugs with guns. All the same, the latter are a worry for us. We are only 50,000 people, and we’re not used to such things. I’ve just posted a piece on my personal blog called “Locking the doors and windows”, which outlines the current situation. The days are long past when we could leave our homes and cars with the keys in the doors.

Our Police Force reports to the Foreign & Commonwealth Office in London (we are a British colony, still), and have ready access to law-enforcement experts on gangs and street muggings. However, experts from English cities or Northern Irish sectarian squabbles aren’t always relevant in a tiny Caribbean Island, and the failure to recognise that fact has wasted millions of dollars in recent years. It’s a continual struggle.

 

GordonBarlow
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Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 6:17 pm

I will very shortly be moving to the island and am interested in how would you describe your crime problems now? The RCIPS regularly advertise for ex-pat officers to join. The powers that be must see something in them to request their services.

 

Jamesy5008
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Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 11:20 pm

Well, it's gradually gotten worse over the years. Street violence is what scares us most, of course: corruption is blatant, but not scary, if you see what I mean. Cayman is nothing like Chicago (!), but there are places now that aren't safe to visit after dark. We have occasional home invasions, which we didn't before. Car thefts have become common, and scooters and motorbikes. Usually the vehicles are stripped down and the parts shipped across the water. Local criminal gangs cooperate with Jamaican ones, which adds a measure of violence that is relatively new to us all.

Was there anything specific you wanted to know about, Jamesy?


_________________

barlowscayman.blogspot.com

 

GordonBarlow
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Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:11 am

Yes. Where is the last place i should rent a house?

 

Jamesy5008
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:58 pm

There are some *streets* I wouldn't recommend, but this is a small island and there aren't any large *areas* that are dangerous. Maybe Dog City and Rock Hole should be avoided, and Birch Tree Hill, but those are slummy parts that you probably wouldn't want to live anyway. One thing I do recommend is that newcomers rent houses or apartments reasonably close to where they work. Which will be roughly where, for you, by the way?

 

GordonBarlow
Regular Poster
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Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:46 am

I'll be working in George Town. I wasn't planning on living there. South sound or Savannah was what I was thinking.

 

Jamesy5008
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Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Cayman's crime problem

Post Posted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:41 pm

South Sound is a fine area, but rents are generally high. Savannah is also popular, but there are traffic jams in the morning and evening rush-hours. Mind you, what we call a jam is a thirty-minute delay and thirty cars at a standstill. We're pretty spoilt in that regard! It's all relative.

 

GordonBarlow
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