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Trinidad and Tobago

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in areas of North America not listed above (e.g. other Caribbean countries, Central American countries etc.)

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Trinidad and Tobago

Post Posted: Wed May 31, 2006 5:51 pm

We are thinking of moving to TnT following a job offer. Has any members lived there or visited recently. I need information with regards to security, schools etc. Any advice much appreciated.

 

Stokesy
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Re: Trinidad and Tobago

Post Posted: Tue Jul 03, 2007 6:59 pm

hello! any filipino nurses working in trinidad and tobago? just wanna ask for some advice because i was offered a job there. what is it like working there? =)

thanks in advance! mabuhay! =)

 

wrenwren
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Re: Trinidad and Tobago

Post Posted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:06 pm

Just back from Tobago, definately third world for the most part, talking to the locals things are bad in both countries, crime rates high esp murder, drug related crimes and clear up rate very low.

I certainly would not be happy to live there, with or without children, too many men in particular hanging around with nothing to do. Apparently the goverment scheme for employment is mostly a joke, a few hours work then they 'lime' for the rest of the day, perpetuating the culture of laid back to horizontal life style. There are schemes for giving land to locals for allotments and there do seem to be a fair few that are working at it.

From driving round Tobago we saw many different places of worship and schools not sure if they are related one to the other or not. We did wonder if the whole village was one religion or not. Many houses are barely that and new law means property can only be sold to locals or returning natioals we were told. A few guests at the hotel spoke of having property and glad they were able to sell before new law as not many locals can afford to buy.

Good luck with your research and decision.

 

lastchance
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Re: Trinidad and Tobago

Post Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 5:18 am

I have lived in Trinidad for seven years and worked at a local bank as well as at a private, International School. Yes, there is a high crime rate currently and where I live (not in a gated community) I do not venture out to walk alone. However, it is beautiful here and, as always, if you have enough money, you get all the conveniences that make life easier.

Depending on your situation, I know many famililes for whom companies have given stipends, housing, car, security, education allowances, etc. to employees they relocate. If you are one of those, you will be in a secure housing area with all the "buffers" needed to be relatively safe.

I can't take what I call "living in a bubble" however, and prefer to live actually within the country. So I have become streetwise, I know where and when it is safe to go, and with whom. I have learned the customs and how to relate to people. While this is a country with a wide mix of people, I have encountered more social/class discrimination than other types. If you are primarily around the "upper eschelon" in terms of living, working, and entertainment, you would probably be fine here.

Also, if you are more adventurous and can appreciate a country overflowing with a rich cultural heritage, extremely friendly and humorous people (they can also be very manipulative), a large reservoir of creative and artistic talent, an amazing musical and visual arts scene, and of course...the tropical climate and landscape...even while experiencing frequent power outages, water shortages, flooding, poor roads, etc., then you would be fascinated by Trinidad. I am. That's why I'm here.

NOTE: I would not put children in the local schools. They are way behind in terms of curriculum, methodology, facilities, etc. But there are some excellent schools who offer Canadian and U.S. educational experiences.


_________________

\"I took the road less travelled...\"

 

d2pans
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