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what part do i move to?

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Canada.

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what part do i move to?

Post Posted: Fri Jan 06, 2006 2:45 am

myself and my partner are wanting to move to canada with our two kids we have narrowed the choice down to british columbia or alberta but dont know what part to go to. we are planning two visits before making any commitments, i was hoping to gain some info as to the best place for job prospects and schools im a diesel hgv mechanic with 12 years experiance and hoping for a job in a truck dealership enviroment.


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cm

 

weedanny
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Re: what part do i move to?

Post Posted: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:21 pm

IN a country as vast as Canada, trucking is a huge industry, and we NEED experienced diesel mechs.

Alberta has many oil field and gas field operations that are well established, as well as lots of exploration drilling companies, that drill test wells. All of them need diesel mechs. In addition, the large cities of Calgary, Edmonton, and Medicine Hat and Leithbridge, all have at least 5 diesel truck dealerships each, such as Mack, Ford, Freightliner, Kenworth, and Cummins.

Alberta's geography is a mixture of rolling foothills, and farther west you get into the Rocky Mountains, with higher elevations. There are lots of large grain farms ( an avearge size farm is over a thousand acres ) and they all have diesel powered equipment, and the majority of the farmers have personal pick up trucks that burn diesel, as well. So you can see that your job skills are NEEDED here. Many of our experienced mechanics are getting close to retiremeny age, so we need replacements now. The same goes for qualified heavy goods drivers, especialy those with hazardous materials training, or tanker certificates.

British Columbia is more mountainous than Alberta, with peaks that top 12,000 feet. If you take a look at a good map, you will see that B.C has only a few interior roads , away from the costal region and that is due to the mountains. The roads that run thru the mountain passes are good in summer but rough driving in the winter. Rough reffers to the weather conditions, which in some cases, cause the highway to be closed, due to snow fall and/or an avalanche. Closures may run to 2 days or longer.

B.C.'s largest cities are Vancouver, and it's suburbs, and Victoria, on the island, and Kamloops, and Kelowna in the southern interior, and Prince George and William's Lake in the central interior of the Province. B.C. has many areas that are wilderness and forest, so there are jobs in the logging industry, servicing the trucks . If you take a job in a isolated area, housing is sometimes provided, as a job perk, along with "isolation pay".

B.C. because of the Pacific current, has a milder winter, on the coast than Alberta, with more rain on the west coast. The interior, due to the mountains, gets heavy snows, as I mentioned previously, in some years as much as 12 feet of snow, in a winter season that runs from November to April. The summers are wonderfull and the farther north you go in either B.C. or Alberta, the longer the day light hours are, with only 5 hours of darkness in mid July. On the other hand in winter the days are very short, with long darkness, with dark falling at 4pm in January.

OK lots to think about, right?

My main message is this ........Good, qualified mechanics are in demand here.

You will need to get your qualifications vetted here, before you can go to work. and you can find out about that when you are here on a visit.

Come to Canada twice, once in summer, once in winter, in February. As UK citizens you don't need a visa to VISIT Canada. Just your passport. Bring a good camera, and a note book to write things down, so you don't forget important facts. Do lots of web searching for infomation about Canada. I can help you with that, if you like.

I am a retired military intelligence type, born in Toronto, and my family has been in Canada, from Northern Ireland, for just over 200 years.

Let me know what else you need to find out, and I will try to help you.

Jim Bunting. Toronto. Ontario. Canada.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
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Re: what part do i move to?

Post Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 4:26 am

just a note to say thank you to buntingj a load of info and some questions answered as you can imagine there are alot.thanks again and thanks for the offer of further help i will be in touch.


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cm

 

weedanny
Newbie
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Re: what part do i move to?

Post Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:07 pm

Weedanny:

OK contact me either here or at my private e-mail at

jimbunting @ rogers.com

Glad to be of help to you.

Cheers........ Jim Bunting. Toronto.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
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