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Moving furniture from US to Canada

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Canada.
Subforums: Property for Sale/Rent

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Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:01 am

Hi

We are planning a move to Canada from US in two months time.

Is it worth bringing new furniture(House hold effects like cots,settee -a month old) and electrical stuff like dryer,washer.

How about bringing the van?-Is it better to drive it or hand it to the car movers.

Do I have to pay extra tax? or anything else I should know?

Many Thanks for your help

Meg

 

meg905
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 6:15 am

Meg:

You need to prepare for the entry to Canada, by producing a B4 form from this CBSA website, and making 3 copies and filling them in fully.

The B4 form is the proper one to present at the Canadian border. It list all of the things that you are bringing into Canada, along with the values of those items. READ the form to see how the values are determined.

Here is the link for the B4 importation form.

www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/...b4-05e.pdf

You are entering as a "settler " for the purposes of the Canada Customs Act. If there will be items that are being sent to Canada LATER, fill out the B4A form in addition to the B4 for the initial entry.

AS to the vehicle. It is your choice, but I would suggest keeping it and driving it to the border entry point. Make SURE that that the U.S. movers are legally able to carry your goods across the International border. Many US movers are NOT permitted to carry into Canada, because they do not have the proper permits from the Canadian Provincial Governments. Ask them to produce their permits to transport goods in Canada.

Generally speaking your household goods are not subject to duty or tax on entry in Canada. The van vehicle will be checked to see that it is on the list of US made vehicles that have been tested and are allowed into Canada re the emissions systems installed on them.

Make sure to have ALL the identification papers for each person that is entering Canada with you. Proof of citizenship is important. A state driver's license is NOT proof of your nationality, while a original US birth certificate, or US passport , is.

If you have more questions, ask me here.

Jim B. Toronto.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:33 pm

Hi Jim, I've asked some questions about shipping previously but no-ones replied to me! So I wonder if you can help me.

The b4 form, do I put on that what items I have with me on the day of arrival to Canada and on the b4a what will be following on in my shipment?

The area to write in is so small, I assume they just want a rough summary.

 

blindtigress
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:53 pm

Blindtigress:

Yes the B4 form is for the initial arrival, in person, while the B4A is for items that arrive lateras freight either by air or ocean container.

I'm going to assume that you will be arriving by air? In that case, it will be a short list as the airlines do have their luggage limits, right?

List the items as "personal affects for settlement in Canada" and specify the most valuable items, such as jewellery. Value is the current value, not the " new " price that you paid in the past, in the UK.

There is no duty or tax on the things that you bring to Canada " for your own use". The rule is that you can't sell them within a year of arrival in Canada. If the B4 form is not big enough attach an additional page to it.

My previous answer was to someone coming into Canada from the USA, where they are bringing many household items in a commercial moving truck, along with a vehicle. Your case is different in that you will not have nearly as much stuff to list, I think?

My usual advice to people coming from the UK, about house hold items is this.

Balance the high cost of shipping a ocean container full of used furniture to Canada , versus being able to buy a matching set of everything when you get here. I have seen people who were actually intending to bring their own sink tub and toilet, from the old house in th UK and install them in a house here in Canada. To me that is just silly. By all means bring the family treasures, but leave the old carpert and such behind.

Any more questions? Ask me here. That is my "knack "finding information about the process of "gettin here ".

Cheers Jim. B.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:41 pm

Thankyou Jim, I knew I could rely on you for useful info!

I am mainly bringing personal stuff, clothes, photo's, sentimental items, a few nursing books, ornaments that kind of thing. I have sold all my furniture. I sometimes wonder why I am bringing anything tho, new start and all that!

 

blindtigress
Frequent Poster
Frequent Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 5:05 am

Blindtigress:

Don't make the error of coming without some "comfort items " like the fave photo of your Mum and Dad, or the old dog that you used to love as a kid. For me it would be the scrap book photos of my old army buddies and the horrible places that we were sent to.............

Being homesick is a funny thing , it affects some people very much and others not at all. In any case, I'm glad that I was able to help you with the Import forms.

One of my many jobs, over the years, was as a commercial driver, crossing back and forth over the International border with loads of various goods. I got to the point that I was advising the other drivers at the Customs office on how to make out their manifests and how to get their goods released on a " C 9 " quick release form.

Nowadays it is all computer generated, with pre-clearance, and the border crossing only taking 10 minutes now, for a truck load. Private loads take longer.

Are you close to the date for coming over here ?

Jim B. Toronto.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Thank you Jim

Post Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:04 pm

We appreciate your valuable information .This has really helped me to proceed with my moving procedures.

Information on legally permit movers is great. I can eliminate lots from my movers list.

I am sure that in following days i'll be logging in here for plenty of help.

Thank you very much. Very Happy

 

meg905
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
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