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Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Canada.

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Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 11:43 pm

While I'm on a roll. thought I would add just a couple of tips / traps for newbies to Canada, some of which I didn't discover until later.

Winter tips
- make sure you get salt / ice melt for your drive and paths. Its your responsibility to keep them clear. Slipping on an ice patch is not fun.
- buy shoe "rubbers". They are rubbers that go over your shoes to protect them. I didn't have them our first winter and my work shoes got destroyed by the snow and salt (leather and salt don't mix).
- depending on when you arrive don't leave it to late to get winter things. Its becomes hard to find simple things like boots, gloves, etc in Jan / Feb, the stores start to stock spring clothing and wind down winter stock. Same with snow shovels and the like. Last winter because Toronto had more tha usual snow you could not find a shovel at my local stores in Jan / Feb they were all sold out.
- Depending where you live don't waiste money on a snow blower. we have a long driveway but could not justify buying one. In my opinion in places like Toronto you don't need one - just enjoy the exercise.
- never turn off yoir heating if you go away in winter 9everyone seemed to know this but me). Pipes can freeze and explode.

General
- join Costco - can save some money on items
- don't forget to tip for service on the pre tax amount. Generally 15% +
- There are lots of options for buying clothes etc from brand names down. Winners is a cheaper alternative to the Bay for example.
- get rubbish bins with the tie down straps - keeps the racoons out
- if travelling to the US sometimes it is cheaper to drive across the boarder and fly out of the US domestically - we drive down to Buffalo.

Also I agree but disagree with Jim. Ice hockey is a great sport to watch but the Leafs don't know how to win (ditto Jays, Argo's and TFC). A TFC soccer game is good, the fans are really into it. Soccer is actually played quite a lot over here particularly at junior level in summer. I play in an old mans league (over 41's) and it is a great bunch of guys. Have to admit though most have a accent originating from the UK.

 

OzCan
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Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:42 pm

Thanks again, it really sounds like you will miss it there. The winter info is invaluable!!

Jim,

What I meant by the leafs was I was end up supporting a team that can't win, so that is a habit I would like to break!!! Mind you I do enjoy watching the NFL and am a big NY Giants fan.

Andy

 

andychg
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:58 pm

Andychg :

OK now I get it.

In the NHL there are 30 teams to choose from, so no one is tied to any one team. Here in Toronto, there are a number of minor league teams, besides the Maple Leafs, that you can watch. Lower costs, and more of a "small town " feeling to the games.

The Leafs "farm team " are the Toronto Marlies , who are in the American Hockey League ( which has teams fron both Canada and the USA in it ). They play at the Ricoh Centre, which is located near the lakeshore, downtown. It only has 8,000 seats, compared to 19,000 at the Air Canada Centre, where the Leafs play their home games.

On the NFL...... Buffalo has played one exhibition game, in Toronto, so far this season, with a further regular season game to be played at The Rogers Centre in December. They are testing the waters, to see if they can draw enough fans here to make it worth while to attempt to get a NFL franchise in Toronto. I don't think that will happen, as the CFL has a faster and more challenging game, with a field that is longer and wider, and only three downs to move the ball 10 yards. This results in more passing and lots more third down kicks to move the ball downfield.

The NFL is so tied to American TV coverage, that I don't think that the League will ever expand into Canada. The owners of the Rogers Centre are hoping for that, but I don't think that it will fly here.

One of the cable TV packages that you can buy here has 24 hour a day sports coverage, with European footie , auto racing and boxing, mixed in with golf and even fishing programs. This is a add on to the regular 99 channels that come in the basic bundle. We have the "full house deal " that gives us 999 channels, and our computer high speed conection, plus two cell phones, all for about 75 GBP a month.

Jim B.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 1:45 am

Jim,

We have satellite TV as we are not in a cabled area. We have the basic package with no sports or movies, high speed internet, land line telephone that costs about £30 GBP per month. If we wanted the full house deal it would be about £55 GBP per month and the cellphones are about £20 GBP each.

Mind you I don't know how many channels we do have but most of them aren't worth watching such as shopping channels etc.

I don't know much about CFL as I have never see any....will go on youtube now and try to find out a bit more!!

Andy

 

andychg
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:36 pm

I;m bringing this one back for Tonya to read.

It is by a Australian man who moved to Canada for two years, with his family on a work transfer. He lays it out nicely, both the pro and con sides of his Canadian experience.

Tonya..... please take a look at my Ontario Photo Album stickey, at the top of this page, to see hundreds of my own photos, including some from Ottawa.

Jim B.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:53 am

Hi guys! I’m from Toronto and I’m looking for talented tattoo master! If you need a job contact us here:
binitattoo.com/

 

Krawling
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Moving to Canada - good, bad & different - Aussie view

Post Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:36 am

I loved Canada. I have lived there for 7 years. Of course, every country has its negative sides, but I believe that Canada has more positive sides in mentality, people, food, culture, and medicine.

 

austinsparrow19
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