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Rememberance Sunday

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Canada.

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Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 9:26 pm

Hi,

I was wondering yesterday whilst buying my poppy, what symbol do Canadians use for rememberance Sunday?

Is it the same as we use over here? I know Canadians were at Ypres and Flanders.

Just curious.

Thanks

Andy

 

andychg
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 12:16 am

We use the poppy. The author of the poem "In Flanders field" was John McCrae, born on November 30 1872 in Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Thanks for reminding me that I need to get one before November 11th.


_________________

"If I have learned anything, it is that an acquiescence to one's distinctiveness should not be mistaken for a preoccupation with one's limitations." - Mark A. Foster Ph.D.

 

AlanD
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:12 am

Thanks Fuzzy

 

andychg
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 5:09 pm

Andychg :

Canada pays tribute to our war dead on November 11th of each year, at 11 am.

The CBC carries a live TV broadcast from Ottawa, where the PM and the GG lay wreaths at the National War Memorial site. The crowd is quiet and solemn. At the end of the official ceremony, after the military units have marched off, the people come forward and lay their individual poppies on the top pf the tomb of the "unknown soldier" which lies directly in front of the memorial. By the time that the last poppy has been placed, the entire tomb is covered in red.

As you probably know, we have had our troops fighting in Afghanistan since 2002, and our death toll is now at 98. Each time one of our soldiers is killed in action, the body is flown back to Canada, to land at CFB Trenton, here in Ontario. The funeral procession proceeds along the 401 highway, to Toronto, where an official autopsy is conducted. Afterwards, the burial takes place in the soldier's home town.

The section of the 401 highway, from Trenton to Toronto has been officially re-named the "Highway of Heros " by the Ontario Provincial Government, in tribute.

Here is a link to a whole photo page about the Highway of Heros ,and the way that ordinary Canadians come out to honour our soldiers.

images.google.ca/image...4&ct=title

Each photo image opens a seperate page of text and photos for you to look at.

This is one of the many ways that we follow the words of John McRae's poem.

By the way, our current 10 dollar bill has the first verse of that poem on it along with images of the National War Memorial, white peace doves, and a Royal Canadian Legion member, standing at attention, with his granchildren standing beside him.

Here is an image of that bill ;

Go here :

images.google.ca/imgre...n%26sa%3DX


Jim B.

 

buntingj
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:34 pm

Thanks Jim,

As you are probably aware we pay tribute on the 11th hour of the 11th day on the 11th month too, well the guns fell silent after the first world war. If the 11th does not fall on a Sunday we have our rememberance parades all over the country on the Sunday after the 11th. Every year the parade gets smaller as the WW2 veterans are getting less and less, we still have a couple of WW1 veterans in the parade. When you see these men marching with all their medals gleaming in the sun it makes me feel proud.

The main one is at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London. You will find Cenotaph's up and down the UK in towns and villages.

At present all our fallen heros who are killed in Afghanistan or Iraq get flown into RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire, and every time the cortege passes through, the people stop and pay their respects. There was an item on the news a couple of weeks ago, how the Forces paid tribute to the town to say thank you with a march through the town and a fly past.

www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshir...ture.shtml

Personally I don't think as a nation we honour our forces enough, one day a year to say thank you for a life time of freedom just somehow doesn't seem enough! Know what I mean.

Thanks

Andy

 

andychg
Regular Poster
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 6:56 pm

Andychg :

Here is a link to the Poppy webpage of the Royal Canadian Legion, that gives some interesting statistical information about how we honour our war dead.

18 million poppys distributed , in a country with 32 million people. That says something, doesn't it ?

Go here :

www.legion.ca/About/poppy_e.cfm

Jim B.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
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Re: Rememberance Sunday

Post Posted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:56 am

In Canada, today(Nov. 11) is called Rememberance day. Im an employee of the federal government so I get the day off. Unlike most federal employees who take the day to finish thier yard work(raking leaves), I typically participate in the ceremonies by-at least- attending a ceremony. I just returned home from being at the ceremony held at the National War Memorial, in Ottawa, and it was worth standing in the cold and damp weather to support "the boys".!

In 2000 Canada brought home, from France, the body of an unknown Canadian soldier of the Great War. This soldier is known as The Unknown Soldier, and is buried at the National War Memorial.

Spontaneously, after the first Rememberance day ceremony with the Unknown Soldier Buried at the National War Memorial, the public began placing thier poppies on his grave out of respect. Watching this tradition develop by -average- joe Public- is heart felt for all Canadians.

 

FingerSled
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