±JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER

Get useful expat articles, health and financial news, social media recommendations and more in your inbox each month - free!




We respect your privacy - we don't spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

±Compare Expat Providers

Expat Health Insurance Quotes

Foreign Currency Exchange Quotes

International Moving Quotes

We're very social! Follow Expat Focus on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+

Expat Focus Facebook PageExpat Focus on TwitterExpat Focus Pinterest PageExpat Focus Google+ Page

Notify me when new content is added about a country

±Expat Focus Partners

Please Introduce Yourself Here

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Mexico.
Subforums: Property for Sale/Rent

Reply to topicReply to topic
Forum FAQSearchView unanswered posts
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next 
  
Patricia -Mazatlan, Mexico

Post Posted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:08 am

Hi there!
I live in Mazatlan, Mexico. I came here by car from North Carolina with my son and Yorkie. We've been here for about 6 months and really enjoying it. Reason for coming: time for a change, tired of US health care issues, etc. etc. We've met many other wonderful expats from the USA and Canada. Many are retired and spend Oct - April here. The summer is really hot and humid - and somewhat lonely (younger than most). But it's doable. Say "hi" if you're in Mazatlan! I'm always open to new friends!

 

pbespinoza
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Please Introduce Yourself Here

Post Posted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 12:53 am

Hi, my wife and I live in S. Florida, and are looking to leave the humidity and hurricanes behind. We are considering visiting San Miguel. I was concerned about the negative article I read about the "entitled" expats living there.
We love to travel, and would make a concerted effort to learn and speak Espanol. Are there normal people living in San Miguel? How would we contact someone before making the trip to visit, or should we consider elsewhere like
Guanacastle?

 

rmlibby
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
We are looking for a writer's life in Mexico

Post Posted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:38 pm

Hi everyone. My DH (Robert, 62) and I (Diane, 58) are AGAIN talking about moving to Mexico. We are both modestly retired. We've done research about retiring to Mexico off and on over the last ten years, but we're concerned that the information we've found is already horribly out of date. We wish we could just throw our stuff in storage, hop in our truck with a few essentials, drive down from Georgia, and move into a furnished rental property where we could live and learn the lay of the land. Our lease expires in March of next year. Robert's ready to jump, but I'm thinking we can't get it together by then.

I'm hoping some seasoned expats can suggest a few areas for us to look into that would be a good fit for us. (I've gone into more detail about who we are below, if you care to read down that far!) We'd love to meet like-minded expats, by email and/or in person, so write if you feel so inclined: dkistner at ultradia dot org, rsking at futurecycle dot org.

Who we are/what we do: Robert, a retired software engineer, is Director/Editor of Futurecycle Press (futurecycle.org). In my former lives, I was a typographer, an editor, and a trauma therapist. I now assist Robert with the press, editorially and with book design, plus do my own putzing thing. Last year we finally were able to move to a rural area where I could live my own dream (a permaculture garden and chickens), and Robert could live his (writing, meeting other writers, and growing the press). But it's not where we're supposed to be.

Why do we want to move to Mexico? Robert is frustrated that he still has to do so much sideline IT work now to keep us afloat that he has no time to write, plus his "number-one priority" is to get out of the U.S. I'm essentially frustrated that Robert's frustrated and that I cannot implement my own vision as quickly as I would like. I'm a hopeful, live-and-let live person, but I'm beginning to think Robert may be right that the U.S. will soon collapse into gun-toting chaos. I fear that too many people here have neither the values nor the skills to help each other survive. People are just too uptight and stressed out here!

Robert majored in Spanish in college, and I'm trying to re-learn the little bit of Spanish I used to know. I'd prefer being somewhere at a higher elevation where the temperatures are not too insanely hot but would go anywhere except to Hurricane Alley or under a threatening-to-erupt volcano. Robert loves the mountains. He would love to be in a high-level workshop with fellow writers, and I would be happy sharing ideas about growing food, having a fresh market nearby, eating lots of Mexican food, and chillin' with my peeps.

We are used to living around diverse, not-well-off people. A life of the mind and in harmony with nature is more important to us than things or "getting ahead." We would be very uncomfortable living in an area where expats keep themselves separate from the locals and essentially duplicate the "gated community" or "party, party, party" type of American existence.

Good access to the Internet is essential.

 

dkistner1111
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Please Introduce Yourself Here

Post Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 11:19 pm

My name is Elizabeth. Orginally from Washington State (USA) but living in NYC since 2003 after stints in Washington DC, Boston, and Japan. I recently married a Mexican man and my son and I (from a previous relationship) are considering relocating to Estado de Mexico to join my husband there. I am an English as Second Language teacher and currently work at a language program for new immigrants. Glad to meet all of you! I have a lot of questions about immigration, finding work in Mexico and finding a school for my son.

E

 

eas1030
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Please Introduce Yourself Here

Post Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 7:00 pm

Hello,

My name is Rachael and I got married in Mexico in October. I currently live in Manchester UK with my husband and our two dogs. We loved Mexico and are seriously looking into moving but are unsure how. I have got the link to the "expat focus moving guide" which will be my first place to start but any tips welcome.

 

RosieCollins
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Moving to Mexico from Uk

Post Posted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 2:52 am

Most important go to the Mexican embassy in London and they will give you all the information and paperwork that you need to move. Check their opening times on their website as they are only open for enquiries in the morning. You can also download the paperwork from the website but some guidance from the Embassy is important as it does have a tendency to change. Best of luck it's a great country with great people.

 

Doubsie
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Please Introduce Yourself Here

Post Posted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 6:40 pm

Hi there

I am Christophe, going to spend some months in Mexico, at least.
I come for work but I am also looking at different ways to spend good times: soccer, going out, visit new things, trips, etc...

feel free to come back to me with tips

Chris

 

ChristopheLassuyt
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
Page 2 of 3
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next






Expat Health Insurance Partners


Aetna International

Our award-winning expatriate business provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. In addition, we have helped develop world-class health systems for governments, corporations and providers around the world. We want to be the global leader in delivering world-class health solutions, making quality health care more accessible and empowering people to live healthier lives.

Aviva International

Health is your number one priority. At Aviva we understand this, which is why we’re focused on helping you and your family access high quality healthcare at home or overseas. Our award winning medical insurance will help you get the treatment you need or simply provide guidance and advice wherever you are, 24/7.

Bupa Global

At Bupa we have been helping individuals and families live longer, healthier, happier lives for over 60 years. We are trusted by expats in 190 different countries and have links with healthcare organisations throughout the world. So whether you're moving abroad for a change of career or a change of scene, with our international private health insurance you will always be in safe hands.

Cigna International

Cigna has worked in international health insurance for more than 30 years. Today, Cigna has over 71 million customer relationships around the world. Looking after them is an international workforce of 31,000 people, plus a network of over 1 million hospitals, physicians, clinics and health and wellness specialists worldwide, meaning you have easy access to treatment.