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Adding a parcel of land to an existing tapu

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Turkey.

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Adding a parcel of land to an existing tapu

Post Posted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:17 am

I was quite lucky a few years ago. It took about 6 months to get the tapu to my house registered in my own name. (in fact, 15 minutes AFTER the tapu was placed in my hands, a fax came from Ankara saying 'no more tapus to foreigners'!)

Now I have the chance to purchase a small plot of land (3x10 meters) adjacent to my garden following the death of my neighbor. I badly need a place to park my car and this will do just fine.

How do I go about changing the tapu? Is the law still forbidding land ownership by foreigners? What is the current status of this law?

And for such a small plot, am I going to have a world of trouble?

Once I pay for the land and get a signed paper, signed by the heirs and two witnesses, can I wait a bit before trying to change the name on the tapu? I'm considering dual citizenship (after all these years here) just to make things easier when buying and selling property.

I'm actually retired here in Turkey and get SSK every month. Is this at all beneficial or am I still considered an 'outsider'?

Thanks  

StoneOwl
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Re: Adding a parcel of land to an existing tapu

Post Posted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 3:09 pm

- StoneOwl

I was quite lucky a few years ago. It took about 6 months to get the tapu to my house registered in my own name. (in fact, 15 minutes AFTER the tapu was placed in my hands, a fax came from Ankara saying 'no more tapus to foreigners'!)

Now I have the chance to purchase a small plot of land (3x10 meters) adjacent to my garden following the death of my neighbor. I badly need a place to park my car and this will do just fine.

How do I go about changing the tapu? Is the law still forbidding land ownership by foreigners? What is the current status of this law?

And for such a small plot, am I going to have a world of trouble?

Once I pay for the land and get a signed paper, signed by the heirs and two witnesses, can I wait a bit before trying to change the name on the tapu? I'm considering dual citizenship (after all these years here) just to make things easier when buying and selling property.

I'm actually retired here in Turkey and get SSK every month. Is this at all beneficial or am I still considered an 'outsider'?

Thanks




To answer your last point first- yes you are still considered a foreign national in TR!
It depends on your nationality as to whether it is really worth considering becoming a citizen of TR. Personally as a Brit female for me it was worth it, everything to gain and nothing to lose. Bear in mind males have military obligations- no matter what the age is unless they are about 70+! Surprised Joking apart, the military issue is risky to say the least!
Then again some countries do not recognize dual nationality so this needs thorough investigation.

Tapus for foreigners? It appears that title deeds may be issued to non nationals. Non nationals are allowed to purchase up to 10% of the total area covered in the local planning zone of a town.
I would advise checking up on all this at your local deed office (tapu dairesi) and if you wish to purchase the little plot of land adjacent to your property, try to go the same route as you did when you bought your house. Check that the plot does in fact have title deeds. If possible consult an English speaking solicitor.

Some people may say it's hardly worth the bother since you only require it for car parking purposes, on the other hand a few years down the line someone may decide to build a chicken shack or something grotesque- then the hassle would have been worth it!


Good luck! Smile

 

Ikeepforgetting
Forum Leader - Turkey
Forum Leader - Turkey
 
 
  
Re: Adding a parcel of land to an existing tapu

Post Posted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 4:02 pm

Great reply and very helpful. We're going to town today and will have a 'translator' with us (!) so an inquiry at the tapu office might be just what we will do.
I'm an expat from the US and female. I'm not married, actually I'm a widow.
With this my five dogs, I'm not in a hurry to tie myself down with a spouse as well! The dogs are enough to keep me busy! Laughing

I think it's a good idea to actually have the tapu for this plot legally in my name. In the event that I 'pass on' having the tapu will help my daughter and son keep or sell the house.

I live not far from the coast in Canakkale province. I had to have 'military approval' to purchase the house, I'm hoping the plot of land proves an easier task.

In addition, I was informed that even if the original owner wanted to build a 'chicken coup' on that plot, it isn't possible. There's something about not constructing a building of any sort within 3 meters of an existing property.
Something like that. At the time, I didn't pay much attention to what they said because I wasn't planning to buy the plot of land! I hope this is a true statement.

Thanks again!!

 

StoneOwl
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
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