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moving to ecuador

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Ecuador.

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moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 9:19 pm

has anyone done it or know anything about it? I know one person who moved to ibarra. she likes it and is going to stay but she has met with a lot of frustrating experiences. I was in Ecuador last april and liked it and I am going back In 2 weeks for a visit. I am undecided as to where I would choose to live. anyone who can help is welcome to contact me. thanks.
rod

 

rodreese
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Re: moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 2:52 am

Hi, I realized this forum has been unattended for so long! I moved here by coastal Ecuador after you even posted this. How did you ended up doing? Did you move? I have plenty of stories about life and work in Ecuador. Regards

 

Noelia
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Re: moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 9:50 pm

Hi Noelia,

I have just signed up for this forum, but to expect an answer here is like watching paint dry, going by the previous entry to yours.

However, moving on, I am looking into the future a bit but I may be seeking a warm cheap place to retire to and Equador, possibly Canoa, near the coast looks OK, most of what I have read so far looks good, except for the tap water, not good, means buying every drop of water to drink.

Is Ecuador really as backward as it appears?

Any replies will be welcome?

 

treboreel
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Newbie
 
 
  
Re: moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:55 am

You are too funny treboreel. Yes, I noticed no one come to this site...
I live in Libertad (or La Libertad as its official name is) it means FREEDOM...it does, says a lot the name. To me living in "Freedom" town has meant to have easy and affordable access to the beach (I am in the border with the prime resort area of Salinas), sandy golden beaches, warm sunny weather most the year (dry, though I dont like humidity), organic foods (Ecuador is officially GMO free), easy, quick and affordable Permanent Residency status, closeness to Nature at its full potential (this is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world), and meeting adorable people with good human values (yes there still are those, they are here!).
In other terms Ecuador is the third largest growing economy of Latin America. Unemployment is under 5% and economical outlooks are very positive. In 2011 Ecuador grew 8%.
This is cheap still here but major development in both the public and private sectors are taking place so the trend is to get even better. The growth that has been taking place for the past 4 years is unprecedented. I particulary find no backward aspect in Ecuador, everything is moving forward but I guess it has to do with seeing the glass half full as I am happy here. You can get brick homes (real homes!) from 30K and up. Oceanfronts condos go from 90K and up. With a 25K minimun investment you are entitled to Permanent Status.
Please note that growth started to happen here ever since the Gov had to shut down an US military base which was found to promote drug and people trafficking, support financially and logistically crime, corruption and violent oppositional movements...having said that, watch the English written source of the info on "Ecuador being backwards!" some Gov isnt happy about Ecuador's soverignity. Hope it helps! drop me a line or two if you want further info noeliaroldan2012 @ gmail.com

 

Noelia
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:35 am

- rodreese

has anyone done it or know anything about it? I know one person who moved to ibarra. she likes it and is going to stay but she has met with a lot of frustrating experiences. I was in Ecuador last april and liked it and I am going back In 2 weeks for a visit. I am undecided as to where I would choose to live. anyone who can help is welcome to contact me. thanks.
rod



I moved here 3.5 years ago and it went very smoothly. The key is to be well-organized and prepared ahead of time, and to consult a local Ecuadorian-based attorney to assist with the Visa and permanent residency process. I think if you approach it from that perspective, you will find the move to be surprisingly accommodating and easy. The only caveat is shipping containers of items into Ecuador. My advice, unless you have something you just cannot part with, leave it back in your home country and purchase everything here in Ecuador. Much easier than trying to move large quantities of items into the country, even with the generous program for duty-free importation.

Hector
RDRHGQ @ gmail.com

 

HGQ2112
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: moving to ecuador

Post Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 11:57 pm

well, i ended up buying a town home in Portugal. My wife has dual citizenship and a US green card. We visited Quito together and I had her stay for a month. The end result was she preferred Portugal. She was born in Brasil but grew up in Portugal. Ecuador has more moderate weather but Portugal is European and she and I have traveled all over Europe as well as all over South America so I am happy with the decision.

 

rodreese
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
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