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advice on living in Italy

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Italy.

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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Nov 29, 2004 11:27 pm

The USA is a land made up of immigrants.
Italy is not. I would not recommend moving to a country I have never visited. Avoid small towns.
There are Waldorf Schools in Italy, however they are taught in Italian.
Do not asume everyone or anyone speaks English.
Corina

 

corina
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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Sun Dec 12, 2004 9:29 pm

My wife, a lifelong Canadian like me, recently acquired her dual Canadian/Italian citizenship and I'm in the processing of getting mine via our marriage.

Our plan is to spend half the year in Canada and the other half (guess which one) in Italy. She has relatives in the San Daniele del Friuli region of northern Italy and I'm wondering if you have specific information on that area.

Also, would you happen to have knowledge regarding dual citizens' eligibility for coverage under the national Italian heal-care plan?

Thanks so much for any help you may be able to provide.

Sincerely,
Bob
clysak @ enoreo.on.ca


_________________

Have recently-acquired dual Canadian/Italian citizenship and hope to split the year between the two countries.

 

Robertwl
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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:45 am

Hi Bob,
What a wonderful idea. I don't know much about that area other than it is beautiful. As an Italian citizen I assume you will be covered by the National Health care system. Having relatives there is a big advantage.
Where I live (veneto) most people also pay for private medical care.
The system is tedious and slow, especialy if you need surgery. You will be put on a list. A friend of mine had to wait 6 months for laser knee surgery. Another friend who had an accident, had to wait 2 weeks for emergency surgery. Expect to wait 6 months for a mamogram appointment etc. The upside is it is free, sort off, it is paid by the taxes you will pay. Italy has one of the highest tax rates in Europe, up to 45%.
Pick your Italain relatives brains too!
Auguri,
Corina

 

corina
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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 1:37 pm

Hello Corina,

Thank you for the reply. Regarding the taxes you mentioned as the funding source for the health-care system: would I presume that, if we were in Italy as Italian citizens but not working--that is, as retirees--that we would likely not be expected to pay income taxes since no income would be being produced there...but that we would still be allowed to enrol in the health-care system?

That's my basic understanding, but I'm in the very early stages of acquiring such information.

Robert


_________________

Have recently-acquired dual Canadian/Italian citizenship and hope to split the year between the two countries.

 

Robertwl
Newbie
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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 5:29 pm

Hi Bob,
I honestly don't know the answer to your question. We are Swiss citizens, with permanent resident status in Italy. My husband and I are still working.This would be a good question for the relatives.
Good luck!
Corina

 

corina
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Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 5:41 pm

Thanks, Corina. I look forward to speaking further with them and learning all that I can about life in Italy.

What are temperatures and weather conditions in your part of the country these days?


_________________

Have recently-acquired dual Canadian/Italian citizenship and hope to split the year between the two countries.

 

Robertwl
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: advice on living in Italy

Post Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 5:41 pm

Thanks, Corina. I look forward to speaking further with them and learning all that I can about life in Italy.

What are temperatures and weather conditions in your part of the country these days?


_________________

Have recently-acquired dual Canadian/Italian citizenship and hope to split the year between the two countries.

 

Robertwl
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
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