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Living in Thailand

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Thailand.

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Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Sun Jul 30, 2006 9:55 pm

Are there any 50-something females who have emigrated to Thailand? As I have previously mentioned on this site I am intending to emigrate in December to LOS to teach English (my other occupation is that of Legal Secretary but I have since found out that this is an excluded occupation - so teaching it is to be)
I have been divorced for many years and have a 26 year old son who is also moving to Thailand. I am not looking for a relationship or love, just a better quality of life in better surroundings, doing a job that will be benefitting someone to improve their own lives and at least give me job satisfaction.
I fully understand that there will be many pitfalls to overcome and I am not looking through rose tinted glasses thinking everything is going to be hunky-dory.
If anyone can give me any useful tips, and elaborate a little on their own experiences, I would be grateful[align=justify]


_________________

Elaine in Birmingham

 

moule
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 12:48 am

.
Elaine -

I'm a man living in Thailand.
You are not likely to find many middle-age, women expats here, and single ones are doubly rare.

Have you ever been to Thailand before?
To Asia before?
Do you know what it is like to live here, as opposed to just coming for holiday?
Please prepare yourself: everything is very, very, different than at home.

It is good you said you won't be looking for a man in Thailand.
I'm afraid your social life will be quite limited - limited to other women you might meet.
The situation here is such that English-speaking men will simply ignore a woman of your age.
Perhaps you view that as a benefit.

Going out alone will be somewhat awkward.
You will probably be comfortable, say, eating at restaurants inside the larger hotels, but how often do you want to do that alone?
As for finding a congenial "local", I'd say the chances are slim to none.
Almost all the pubs in Thailand do double duty as brothels.
While you'll probably be served, please don't anticipate a warm welcome.

If you are in Bangkok, there is the British Club.
I've never been, but their web site explains that women are allowed nowadays.
I recommend you look into that and I suspect you'll find a few kindred souls there.

As for the teaching, there are many web sites devoted to foreign teachers in Thailand.
Be aware that foreigners teachers here are primarily men -- young men and retired men -- out for adventure in the exotic orient.
As a foreign woman you might be a bit out of place.
However, all Caucasian teachers are welcomed here, so if you have white skin you'll have no problem finding a job.
If you have blond hair, then finding a job will be even easier.

However, working for Thai bosses will be extremely different than anything you've experienced in your legal secretary job.
Employees in all lines of work here are treated somewhat like house servants on the plantation.
In addition, the status of women in general throughout Asia is very much lower than that in our Western countries.
So please prepare yourself for some difficult times on the job.

Finally, a woman of your age will find Bangkok and Thailand in general to be quite safe.
There just isn't the gratuitous violence here that is becoming common in our home countries.
By all means, don't bring out any fancy jewelry, an expensive watch, or designer accessories.
You don't want to make yourself a target for purse snatchers and pick pockets.
If you can manage to look frumpy, but respectable, you'll simply be ignored in public places.

The climate is always toasty warm, with some hours of sunshine almost every day.
The food is magnificent and cheap, (although often not clean).
The people smile a lot and are -- on the surface -- wonderfully polite.
Living in Thailand will be the adventure of a life time.
.

 

Peter4
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Mon Jul 31, 2006 3:29 pm

There is a teaching and ladies forum on www.thaivisa.com.

Best advice would be to spend a couple of months there before moving permanently if that is possible.

 

SJ18
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Wed Aug 02, 2006 5:44 pm

DearMoule,

Don't worry, please ignore the negative comments that you have received. There are a number of succesful single foreign and Thai women in Thailand and the people who don't recognize this only illustrate their own inexperience and lack of understanding in Thailand. Yes, a stereotype of Thailand is that is is a single male's playground and there unfortunately is truth in that. But please recall that in traditonal Thai society the women have a lot, and often predominant, influence in the household. ( have a look at the influence of the wife of the Prime Minister as a pertinent example).

While Thai society is thought by some to be backward and sexist, I would disagree and suggest that you look to the examples of the head of the Dusit Thani group, a woman, the Auditor General of Thailand, a woman, and the highly respected forensic patholigist Khunying Pornthip, a women. Needless to say the examples of the late Queen Mother and HM The Queen.

The point is Moule, this is Thailand, and a woman can succeed here, the same as a man can. But for both to do so, it has to be with an understanding and acceptance of the Thai way of doing things.

All the best.

 

Jaiyen
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:14 am

Peter4, SJ18 and Jaiyen many thanks for all your comments. As far as pick pockets and purse snatchers go, within the space of approximately 2 years I have had my handbag snatched 3 times - once was outside my own back gate! Which is by a bus stop and there were people waiting for a bus - did they help? did they hell. I know there isn't a country on earth that is crime free - however different countries have different elements of criminal, where I live any crime is drug related and there is now a large gun/knife culture so going out after I get home from work is a big no no. Which is a great shame - to scared to walk your own streets!

My main reason for moving to Thailand is for a better quality of life. Here in dear old "blighty" (to coin a phrase) you only work to keep a roof over your head - just - we are taxed to the hilt, I came to Thailand last year for a holiday and fell in love with the country, the people, the way of life.

I appreciate that it will be a completely different way of life, but I am very adaptable and understand that there is the western way of doing things and the Thai way - I am not that naive as to think I won't have to alter my attitude/outlook/way of thinking etc . By nature I am very straightforward, perhaps a bit too much for my own good and realise that this will have to change, and as I will be a farrang in someone else's country, I see it as my duty (for want of a better word) to conduct myself the way Thais do - to a certain degree anyway.

Financially I am not able to have a "trial run" for a couple of months so it will be all or nothing, anyway if I feel "no I can't really do this" all I have to do is hop back on a plane.

I'm not blonde but going gently grey but hey have you never heard of peroxide? I've never been one for going to pubs etc., did all that when I was a lot younger - typically English I prefer a cup of tea now!!!

That's all for now, once again thank you for your comments please feel free to "speak" to me again or my direct e-mail is moule575 @ hotmail.com


_________________

Elaine in Birmingham

 

moule
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:55 pm

- moule

I appreciate that it will be a completely different way of life, but I am very adaptable and understand that there is the western way of doing things and the Thai way - I am not that naive as to think I won't have to alter my attitude/outlook/way of thinking etc



moule, with that attitude, you will do very well in Thailand.

By nature I am very straightforward, perhaps a bit too much for my own good and realise that this will have to change, and as I will be a farrang in someone else's country, I see it as my duty (for want of a better word) to conduct myself the way Thais do - to a certain degree anyway.



Good point.
And, as you can tell from my posts here, I share that straightforward attitude. Laughing
At first, I thought the Thais would be less than pleased, because they are certainly anything BUT straightforward.
However, I was wrong.
Most of the Thais I've met in two years are thirsty for straightforward conversation, just so long as it is conducted in a quiet voice and a polite manner.
.

 

Peter4
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Living in Thailand

Post Posted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:59 am

Hi Peter4, thanks for your positive response. Most people I have spoken to here have said "go for it" to my face, but who knows what they really think? In all honesty I don't really care, its just someting that I feel I need to do and like I said, if it doesn't work out for whatever reason I can always come back but at least I would have tried.

I also know settling in is not going to happen overnight and that it will take some time but Ive got my health and a few more years left in me - I'm not quite ready to sit with a shawl round my shoulders in a rocking chair - and obviously learning Thai is a must even if its only enough to get by, I should think it is easier to learn a language if you are in the country that speaks it .

That's all for now


_________________

Elaine in Birmingham

 

moule
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
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