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Netherlands

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

A Guide To Public Holidays In The Netherlands

Posted on Friday May 15, 2015 (02:00:43)

Some of the public holidays in the Netherlands coincide with major festivals and celebrations. These are usually non-working days that commemorate some important cultural or historical event. Here is a guide to public holidays in the Netherlands.

New Year’s Day (Nieuwjaarsdag)
This day can be rather quiet with most businesses, post offices and banks closed. Very few people go to work and even public transport services are limited. On the night of December 31st, celebrations are held and some towns also have public gatherings with bonfires.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

A Guide To Tipping In The Netherlands: Who, How Much, When And Where?

Posted on Monday April 06, 2015 (22:23:18)

Tipping can be among the more confusing aspects of living in a new country – expats everywhere often find themselves wondering, “How much should I tip? How do I leave the tip? Should I tip at all?” In countries like the USA, tipping has become an almost universal requirement, and it is not uncommon to hear stories of restaurant staff asking non-tipping customers whether they were unhappy with the service, with the unstated expectation that satisfactory service must be rewarded with a tip, usually 15% of the bill amount. One the other hand, some countries have no tipping culture at all – only the most exceptional service is rewarded with a tip, and even then it may need be pressed upon the server.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

Useful Job Hunting Tips For Expats Moving To The Netherlands

Posted on Friday February 20, 2015 (00:17:33)

There are lucrative job opportunities available in the Netherlands for the right candidates. The recent years have seen jobs open up in various economic sectors such as services, trade, telecommunications and information technology. Here are some useful job-hunting tips for expats moving to the Netherlands.

Working in the Netherlands

Nationals of European Union (EU) countries, European Economic Area (EEA) countries and Swiss citizens can live and work in the Netherlands freely. The exception may be citizens of some of the recent member countries who may have to obtain a work permit for their first year of residency. Nationals of non-EU/EEA countries need to apply for a work permit or residence permit in order to begin working in the country.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

5 Things You Should Do When Living In The Netherlands (And 1 You Definitely Shouldn’t)

Posted on Saturday August 02, 2014 (02:15:36)

Living in the Netherlands is like a dream come true for men and women of all ages from around the world. This is probably because the standard of living in the Netherlands is at par with or perhaps even a bit higher than some of the developed western countries. Moreover, the Dutch are a warm, friendly, welcoming and liberal lot, without being overly formal. There is an abundance of cultural and social activities that you can participate in, which will ensure that your stay in this country a memorable and rewarding experience! Here is a list of 5 things you should do when living in the Netherlands:

1. Cruise along the canals of Amsterdam   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

An Overview Of International Schools in The Netherlands

Posted on Wednesday June 04, 2014 (01:14:11)

Expats in the Netherlands have a choice of many good international schools for their children. The Dutch Ministry of Education partly subsidizes most international schools and these schools remain within ministry rules. Due to this subsidy, the schools are able to offer more affordable fees.

Students eligible for admission into these schools include those from non-Dutch families with expat status living in the country for a limited duration of time, those from internationally mobile Dutch mobiles who have been largely educated overseas and for whom international education will help to ensure continuity, and those from Dutch families bound for international assignments who therefore need to switch from education in Dutch to English.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

5 Expat Clubs In The Netherlands You Should Consider Joining

Posted on Thursday May 22, 2014 (23:56:48)

It is often a challenge for expats to make connections with people in a new place. The good news is that there are ways to slowly and steadily meet new people and build fulfilling friendships and business relationships. One of these ways is to join any of many expat clubs and associations, which are present in most countries. These clubs organize social networking events where new and old expats can come together. The Netherlands too has some excellent expat clubs and here are five of them you may consider joining.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

Top Dutch Cities for Expats

Posted on Tuesday April 16, 2013 (21:15:21)
Amsterdam
With a dense population of 16.6 million, the Netherlands is widely known as the Gateway to Europe, due to its waterway access to Belgium, France and Germany. It is rich in culture, English is widely spoken, the cost of living is cheaper than in other European countries and the climate is mild.

As well as being a hit with tourists from across the World, the Netherlands is a popular destination for expats due to the welcome it provides, which go as far as to let expats with residency status vote in local elections.

Where you reside in the Netherlands will usually depend on your personal situation and which factors are most important to your decision, for example employment, schooling, retirement issues or leisure facilities. If you enjoy culture and typical Dutch features, such as tulips, windmills and canals, then Rotterdam would not be your likely choice; however, if you want a relaxed city, Maastricht could be the ideal place for you to set up your home and new life.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

Dutch Driving Theory Test: Gehaald!

Posted on Sunday June 24, 2012 (23:19:00)

by Tiffany Jarman Jansen

On July 22, 2009 at 9:55 am I took the train to Amsterdam Sloterdijk. I waited 10 minutes outside a bus waiting for the driver to finish his pause. I took the bus to the CBR building. The whole trip, I had my eyes glued to the Driving Theory Manual I had borrowed a few days before. As I flipped pages, I ran through theory rules and statistics.

The past several weeks, I've been preparing for my Rijbewijs Theorie Examen or my Driving Theory Exam. Because I'm not a member of the European Union, I had to get a Dutch driver's license. The part I really love about this is that Brits and Irishfolk and the like belong to the EU and so are able to skip this fun sequence of events and money suckling I have to go through. EVEN THOUGH THEY DRIVE ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE OF THE ROAD AND CAR! Yes, the Dutch drive the same way we do in America, France, Germany, Belgium, etc. Left side of the car, right side of the road. Yet, after 6 months my American license is no longer valid here and I suddenly don't know how to drive anymore? Now, to be fair, since learning all these theory tidbits, I have felt loads safer on the road. Not to mention there were a few things I was doing that aren't so much legal here...   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

The Dutch Kitchen

Posted on Sunday June 24, 2012 (23:16:14)

by Martha Andrus

The Dutch kitchen is pretty basic and mostly involves a lot of green vegetables, potatoes and sausages. A typical Dutch meal involves mashing potatoes and vegetables together and adding sausages.

French fries can be found most anywhere and the favorite place to find the Dutch is at a French fry stand. If you order 'patat met' it is French fries with mayonnaise, which is the favorite of the Dutch. You will also find fresh fish stands sprinkled through the shopping centers and on the corner of the street. You will see the Dutch standing around the fish stand, eating their favorite smoked or raw pickled herring and always with fresh chopped onions. This is not for me but I do appreciate 'watching' them. I will order kibbeling, which is a fresh white fish, battered and deep fried and served with a sauce.   more ...

Netherlands > Articles

Netherlands

Learning Dutch and How to Survive It

Posted on Sunday June 24, 2012 (23:14:19)

by Liz Cross, Crossover Translations

Approximately 20 years ago, I was sitting on the Harwich-Hoek van Holland boat with two friends and a peculiar little guide book. We were taking turns to recite “Spher-ayhkt OO ng-gels ass-too-bleeeeft?” and other natty phases to each other. After a while, we began wondering if we were doing the right thing going to live in a country where people use words like ass-too-bleeeft, even if we were only planning to stay for a few months. Frustrated and slightly unnerved, we gave up and went to watch Robocop in the ship’s cinema instead.

I think that initial optimism followed by shock and awe is a common first reaction to learning Dutch. Ok – unlike me and my friends, not everyone is stupid enough to set off for a new country, thinking they can pick up enough of the language on the cross channel ferry to have a cosy chat when they arrive. The trouble with Dutch is that it is unlikely that you will have heard it anywhere else before you arrive here as it has a pretty small language area. Even if , unlike us, you are smart enough to listen to language CDs beforehand, this is no substitute for the real thing. Despite similarities to German and shared words with English, Dutch really is in a class of its own. The other, much-repeated problem is that most Dutch people speak such good English that you feel like an idiot for even trying and you feel like more of an idiot when they answer your stumbling attempts to speak their language with a smooth reply in near-perfect English and what often looks like a badly-concealed smirk on their faces.   more ...