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Getting There

Mexico - Getting There


Because Mexico borders the United States, your choices for travel are varied. There are basically four main ways to get to Mexico: by plane, bus, car or boat.

If you want to fly into Mexico, you won't have any trouble finding an airport! There are 98 airports in the 31 states, with most flights entering Mexico City first, then continuing on to other destinations.

Many cruise ships also dock in Mexico, particularly in the beach tourist spots.

There are bus lines that go in and out of Mexico, most of which are generally first class and comfortable. Many of them leave from the lower states in the United States such as Texas, California and Arizona, but it is possible to find bus lines that travel northwards.

Finally, you can drive your own car into Mexico, but it's important that you closely follow their strict guidelines otherwise you may find your car being held by the Mexican authorities. First of all, you must get a car permit when entering Mexico. If you don't get one, you will be turned back after you pass the free zone area. It will cost a little under $30, plus a deposit that ranges from $200-400, depending on the make and model of your car. To apply for the permit, you will need the following:

- Your passport or birth certificate
- Your tourist card
- Your car's vehicle registration certificate or title of ownership (this must be in your name)
- If you have leased the car, you will need the leasing or rental contract (note, this too must be in your name)
- A driver's license that was issued outside of Mexico
- An international credit card that was issued outside of Mexico (such as Mastercard, Visa or American Express - this must also be in your name)

It is also important to note that if you plan to drive your car into Mexico, you must have Mexican insurance (even an American policy that contains a "Mexico" clause won't be recognized.)


Read more about this country



Expat Health Insurance Partners


Aetna

Our award-winning expatriate business provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. In addition, we have helped develop world-class health systems for governments, corporations and providers around the world. We want to be the global leader in delivering world-class health solutions, making quality health care more accessible and empowering people to live healthier lives.

Bupa Global

At Bupa we have been helping individuals and families live longer, healthier, happier lives for over 60 years. We are trusted by expats in 190 different countries and have links with healthcare organisations throughout the world. So whether you're moving abroad for a change of career or a change of scene, with our international private health insurance you will always be in safe hands.

Cigna

Cigna has worked in international health insurance for more than 30 years. Today, Cigna has over 71 million customer relationships around the world. Looking after them is an international workforce of 31,000 people, plus a network of over 1 million hospitals, physicians, clinics and health and wellness specialists worldwide, meaning you have easy access to treatment.