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Electricity

Thailand - Electricity


In Thailand the system of electricity supply is fairly straightforward. The company which supplies services is known as EGAT (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand). The company uses both traditional and environmentally friendly methods of generating electricity. The services are then sold on to the distributing companies, which are also state owned. In and around the capital of Bangkok, it is the Metropolitan Electricity Authority (MEA) which supplies homes and in other areas it is the Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA). In order to have your home connected to the service you need to contact the provider at least a week before you move in. You will need to have proof of ID and residency information such as your visa or your tenancy agreement.

Electricity meters are read each month and a bill is printed out there and then. This is usually left for the tenant or homeowner in their mail box or is simply slipped under the door. There are many outlets where the bill can be paid besides the electricity company outlets including post offices, convenience stores and banks, although if you pay after the end of the month then you need to go to the electricity office. Payment methods include cash, cheque and debit card.

The electrical system in Thailand works on a 220 volt AC system at 50 hertz. If you have purchased electrical equipment within the UK or Europe then the most you should need to get it to work in Thailand is an adaptor. Items purchased in Japan or in the US will probably not work in Thailand. The sockets in Thailand can be either 2 pin or 3 pin and most European plugs will be acceptable in Thailand. There is often no earth connection, particularly in some older buildings, so people are warned to beware of electric shocks and extra precautions should be taken.

It is common to experience power cuts while you are in Thailand. These are often triggered by thunderstorms and many people use UPS systems with back-ups to protect their computers. Larger buildings commonly have generators as a back-up electricity source. Cuts can last for a few hours at a time. If there are any problems with your service you simply contact your local electricity board office and report any faults.


Useful Resources

Metropolitan Electricity Authority (MEA)
www.mea.or.th
Tel: 1130 (within Thailand)

Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA)
www.pea.co.th
Tel: 1129 (within Thailand)
Email: webmaster@pea.co.th


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