±JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER

Get useful expat articles, health and financial news, social media recommendations and more in your inbox each month - free!




We respect your privacy - we don't spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

±Compare Expat Providers

Expat Health Insurance Quotes

Foreign Currency Exchange Quotes

International Moving Quotes

We're very social! Follow Expat Focus on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+

Expat Focus Facebook PageExpat Focus on TwitterExpat Focus Pinterest PageExpat Focus Google+ Page

Notify me when new content is added about a country

±Expat Focus Partners

Moving furniture from US to Canada

Discussion forum for expats moving to or living in Canada.
Subforums: Property for Sale/Rent

Reply to topicReply to topic
Forum FAQSearchView unanswered posts
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 6:39 pm

Blindtigress:

Owen Sound is a great part of Ontario, lots of nice people up there, for sure.

I asked about " not nursing " as there is a growing need for midwives here. They have recently ( about 5 years ago ) been given a higher status in the health care system, and more of them are needed in Ontario. Just a thought.

Nice to hear that things are moving along for you.

Jim B.

 

buntingj
Forum Legend
Forum Legend
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:32 am

Hi ,
I moved to canada in nov 2009, as a immigrant but i had not declare all my furniture and some household stuff at the border at the time of immigrating through niagra border,which iam planning to bring now to canada from USA via niagra border. What procedure i have to go through and how much tax do i have to pay or am i exempted from Tax.
Please guide me.
Thank you.

 

sadiq79
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:45 am

- sadiq79

Hi ,
I moved to canada in nov 2009, as a immigrant but i had not declare all my furniture and some household stuff at the border at the time of immigrating through niagra border,which iam planning to bring now to canada from USA via niagra border. What procedure i have to go through and how much tax do i have to pay or am i exempted from Tax.
Please guide me.
Thank you.


Hi
We declared our household things with the value , in the border.We were not asked to pay taxes .
I copied the following from the the link www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/pu....html#s4x2
,please go to www.cbsa.gc.ca for further guidelines of what not to bring .
"Duty and taxes
If you are a seasonal resident and your goods fall within the duty- and tax-free exemption under the seasonal resident provision, you do not have to pay any duty, the goods and services tax (GST), provincial sales tax or harmonized sales tax on those goods, regardless of your intended destination in Canada. However, if your goods fall outside the provision, you will have to pay duty (where applicable) and the GST on those goods.

Entering Canada to work or study
When entering Canada to work for less than 36 months or to study, you can temporarily import your personal and household goods (such as furniture, tableware, silverware, appliances and motor vehicles) duty-and tax-free, as long as the following conditions are met:

•The goods cannot be used by a resident of Canada;
•You are not permitted to sell or otherwise dispose of the goods in Canada; and
•You must take all non-consumable items with you when you leave the country at the end of your temporary residence.
Preparing to enter Canada
Prior to their arrival in Canada, temporary residents are advised to prepare two copies of a list (preferably typewritten) of all items to be imported temporarily, indicating the approximate value, make, model and serial number, where applicable.

Since jewellery is difficult to describe accurately, it is best to use the wording from your insurance policy or jeweller's appraisal and to include photographs that have been dated and signed by the jeweller or a gemologist. This information makes it easier to identify the jewellery when you first enter Canada, and later if you return from a trip abroad with this jewellery.

Declaring your goods
When you arrive in Canada, you should give your list of goods that are accompanying you to the border services officer at the first point of arrival in Canada. The border services officer may ask you to leave a security deposit for your goods, which will be refunded to you when you export the goods from Canada. Should this occur, the officer will issue a Form E29B, Temporary Admission Permit, retain a copy and give you one for your records.

On arrival, you are required to provide adequate identification and proof of your status in Canada (i.e., documentation issued by CBSA/CIC (Citizenship and Immigration Canada), such as your work permit or study permit). If you are entering Canada to work, you should provide a letter of introduction from your employer
"hope this helps. Visit the website for further details.

 

meg905
Regular Poster
Regular Poster
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 5:10 am

Hello everyone, I live in Eastern Europe, I am going to move to Canada. And a question: I have a lot of good things, and I want them to carry in the container. How to carry them in Canada?Friends advised to use a truck like this www.mmovers.ca/sites/a...truck4.png . Someone moved to Canada, can share experiences?

 

KennyBest
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:41 pm

I moved back to Canada from the US 8 years ago. We rented a 26 foot Penske truck and drove it up ourselves.
Filling in the forms with basic descriptions and rough values was fine with the border people then. It was surprisingly easy and painless. Welcome to Canada Smile

 

kingsboy
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
  
Re: Moving furniture from US to Canada

Post Posted: Sat Jul 08, 2017 11:53 pm

Hi! I am a Canadian citizen who will be moving back to Canada after living in the USA. I have received three quotes from international movers. Two of the quotes say that they have to do the packing of boxes to complete the required inventory list. One of the quotes says that its OK for me, the owner, to pack all boxes (PBO). This is quite contradictory and I am not able to find a proper answer to this. It makes common sense to me that it would be easier to get through customs if the movers pack so that they can verify the contents of the boxes.. There is also the issue of what is covered by insurance in either of these cases. Can you help?

 

leetpurple
Newbie
Newbie
 
 
Page 3 of 3
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3






Expat Health Insurance Partners


Aetna International

Our award-winning expatriate business provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. In addition, we have helped develop world-class health systems for governments, corporations and providers around the world. We want to be the global leader in delivering world-class health solutions, making quality health care more accessible and empowering people to live healthier lives.

Aviva International

Health is your number one priority. At Aviva we understand this, which is why we’re focused on helping you and your family access high quality healthcare at home or overseas. Our award winning medical insurance will help you get the treatment you need or simply provide guidance and advice wherever you are, 24/7.

Bupa Global

At Bupa we have been helping individuals and families live longer, healthier, happier lives for over 60 years. We are trusted by expats in 190 different countries and have links with healthcare organisations throughout the world. So whether you're moving abroad for a change of career or a change of scene, with our international private health insurance you will always be in safe hands.

Cigna International

Cigna has worked in international health insurance for more than 30 years. Today, Cigna has over 71 million customer relationships around the world. Looking after them is an international workforce of 31,000 people, plus a network of over 1 million hospitals, physicians, clinics and health and wellness specialists worldwide, meaning you have easy access to treatment.