How To Find A Job In Ireland

Any individual from the European Economic Area (EEA) can apply for work in Ireland without a visa or work permit. Those wishing to emigrate from outside the EEA must secure either a visa or work permit before they are eligible to find jobs in the country.To succeed in the Irish job market, you will need a good level of English, both spoken and written. Being fluent in a second language can also prove advantageous for jobs in multinational companies. Individuals with skills in science, healthcare, technology and finance are also particularly in demand across the country.

Unemployment is at a ten-year low in and the economy is increasingly stable, making Ireland a good choice for relocation. The service sector has a continuous stream of job opportunities, and demand for IT workers and those skilled in hospitality is also high.

You should start your quest for work in Ireland by preparing your CV. This must include your personal contact details, educational and employment history, as well as your relevant skills and details of any references.

Your CV needs to include all relevant information

It is important to check that any qualifications or professional registrations you obtained prior to emigrating are still valid in Ireland before you start applying for jobs.

Job-seeking in Ireland is much the same as in the UK – there are several avenues to pursue in your search for a relevant vacancy, including recruitment agencies, newspapers, dedicated job websites and even social media.

Competition for many skilled jobs in Ireland is fierce, and you will need relevant work experience and high levels of qualifications to secure work in these areas. However, there are some areas in which Ireland has skill shortages; these include engineering, healthcare and transport.

Open days and recruitment events may prove useful in your pursuit of employment. Search online for local events and take each one as an opportunity to make connections and learn more about employment in Ireland. Remember to dress professionally for these days and take along copies of your CV.

Search for networking events in your area

Volunteering is another way to gain experience if you are struggling to secure a job or are unsure of which sector you would like to work in. Volunteer Ireland’s website includes volunteer vacancies all over the country, alongside hints and tips on how to gain the position you desire.

The Irish government contracts outside organisations to provide employment services; the central point for these is the Local Employment Service Network (LESN), whose website will direct you to your nearest centre. The purpose of these centres is to provide job-seekers with support, including assistance with CV writing, searching for jobs and preparing for interviews, as well as information on how to set up your own business.

Ireland is a popular destination for foreign students wanting to learn English, so teaching vacancies are often advertised. The majority of these jobs will be found in and around Dublin, though some other large cities, such as Galway and Cork, may also offer English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching jobs. To apply for one of these jobs you must hold a recognised English Language Teacher (ELT) qualification. These include:

• CELTA
• TEFL
• Trinity ESOL

Application and interview processes are similar to those in the United Kingdom – generally, you will send a CV and covering letter with your application and, if successful, be invited to attend a formal face-to-face interview, usually in the workplace. Try not to be disheartened if you fail to make it to interview stage or even do not hear back about your application; competition for some positions can be extreme.

Once you have been offered a job, you will be required to apply for an Irish PPS number and will also need to set up an Irish bank account to be paid into.

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