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New Zealand – Employment Terms and Conditions

Working Hours in New Zealand

In New Zealand, the standard working week is 40 hours, although some industries may have different arrangements. Employees are entitled to at least one paid 10-minute rest break for every four hours worked and one unpaid 30-minute meal break after working for five hours or more. Additionally, employees are entitled to at least four weeks of paid annual leave per year, which can be pro-rated for part-time workers.

Employment Rights and Benefits in New Zealand

New Zealand has a number of employment rights and benefits in place to ensure that workers are treated fairly and with respect. Some of the key employment rights and benefits in New Zealand include:

Sick leave

Employees in New Zealand are entitled to a minimum of five days of paid sick leave per year after six months of continuous employment with the same employer. Sick leave can be used for personal illness or injury, caring for a dependent who is sick or injured, or bereavement leave.

Parental leave

New Zealand has a parental leave scheme that allows employees to take up to 26 weeks of leave for the birth or adoption of a child. Employees who have worked for their employer for at least six months prior to the expected due date are entitled to up to 18 weeks of paid parental leave. Self-employed workers may also be eligible for parental leave payments.


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Public holidays

There are 11 public holidays in New Zealand, and employees who work on these days are entitled to be paid time-and-a-half for the hours worked, as well as a paid day off if the holiday falls on a day they would normally work.

Minimum wage

New Zealand has a minimum wage that is reviewed annually. As of 1 April 2022, the adult minimum wage is $21.75 per hour.

KiwiSaver

KiwiSaver is a voluntary retirement savings scheme that allows employees to contribute a portion of their income to a savings account that is managed by a KiwiSaver provider. Employers are also required to make a contribution to their employees’ KiwiSaver accounts.

Pensions for Expats in New Zealand

Expats in New Zealand are entitled to the same pension benefits as New Zealand citizens. The pension system in New Zealand is called New Zealand Superannuation, and it is a universal pension that is paid to all eligible residents of New Zealand over the age of 65.

To be eligible for New Zealand Superannuation, individuals must have lived in New Zealand for at least 10 years since the age of 20, with at least five of those years being after the age of 50. The amount of New Zealand Superannuation received is based on the individual’s living situation, such as whether they are single or have a partner who is also eligible for the pension.

Expats who are not eligible for New Zealand Superannuation may be able to receive a pension from their home country, depending on the pension scheme in their country of origin.

Retirement Age in New Zealand

The retirement age in New Zealand is gradually increasing from 65 to 67 years. The increase is being phased in over a number of years, with the full increase to 67 expected to be in place by 1 July 2037.

It is possible to retire earlier than the official retirement age, but this may affect the amount of pension that an individual receives. Individuals can also choose to continue working past the retirement age if they wish.

New Zealand has a number of employment rights and benefits in place to ensure that workers are treated fairly and with respect. From sick leave to parental leave and KiwiSaver, employees in New Zealand are entitled to a range of benefits. Expats in New Zealand are entitled to the same benefits as New Zealand citizens, including New Zealand Superannuation for those who meet the eligibility criteria.

It is important for expats to understand their entitlements and obligations under New Zealand employment law. Seeking professional advice can help ensure that they are receiving the benefits they are entitled to and complying with their legal requirements as employees or self-employed workers.

New Zealand’s retirement age is gradually increasing, which means that individuals will need to plan for their retirement accordingly. Saving through KiwiSaver or other retirement savings schemes can help ensure that individuals have enough money to support themselves in retirement.

Overall, New Zealand offers a range of employment terms and conditions that are designed to protect workers and ensure that they are treated fairly. Expats who work in New Zealand can expect to receive the same benefits as New Zealand citizens, and it is important for them to understand their entitlements and obligations under New Zealand employment law.


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