How To Find A Job In Monaco

Monaco is not a member of the European Union, so all foreign nationals must acquire a work permit if they wish to find employment in the country. Additionally, a new permit must be sought every time an individual changes position or employer. Despite this, most workers in Monaco are from other countries.Many expats who work in Monaco do so in travel and tourism, finance and insurance. When looking for work, it is important to remember that local applicants will be prioritised. Start your search online via websites such as Job Monaco or send a speculative application to a local employer.

In order to work in Monaco, you will need a permit de travail. Your employer will also need to apply for permission from the Service de l’Emploi to hire foreign nationals. This process helps to ensure that Monegasque nationals receive priority in the application process.

To apply for your permit de travail, you will need to either hold a valid residence card, or have valid French identification.

If you have neither of these documents, for example because you reside outside of Monaco or France, your prospective employer will need to submit a contract of employment for a foreign worker to the Service de l’Emploi. Once approved, you will receive the visa required for entry into Monaco.

Your employer might need to submit your contract for approval

When applying for jobs in Monaco, you will need to provide a CV, or resume. The document must be tailored to the job you are applying for and contain all the relevant information from your employment and study history. It is recommended that candidates undertake some research into the company they are applying to. The official language of Monaco is French; it is likely that applications will need to be made in French and that interviews will also be conducted in this language.

When you get to interview stage, it is important to dress professionally, take several copies of your CV with you, remember your identification documents and to have your personal devices on silent mode so as not to disturb your meeting. It is seen as best practice to reiterate your enthusiasm for the role by following up your interview with an email the next day.

The statutory number of weekly working hours in Monaco is 39; any hours worked above and beyond this must be paid as overtime, at an increased rate. Additionally, workers are entitled to 2.5 days of paid leave per month; if you are a mother, this increases by one additional day off per child under the age of 16.

The working week is on average 39 hours long

Working in Monaco will mean that you benefit from not having to pay income tax. Additionally, there is no tax on land or housing. However, there is taxe sur la valeur (TVA), the equivalent of VAT, which is charged at a rate of 20%. Any income from savings based abroad may also incur tax.

Should you be intending to start your own business in Monaco, or obtain work as a freelancer, then you will need to procure a business permit. This is a document issued by the Ministre d’Etat (Ministry of State) and your eligibility will depend on your professional qualifications as well as the nature and size of your business.

Volunteering in Monaco is a useful way to gain workplace experience for anyone struggling to secure employment. Numerous voluntary opportunities can be found in healthcare, particularly supporting elderly residents. There are also plenty of environmental projects to take part in, which could prove to be a stepping stone into a worthwhile career.

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